Fall is in the air

Winter is back with a vengeance, spring and summer seem far away, but at the School of Information we are all planning for the Fall 2017 semester. It will be interesting, challenging and probably very frustrating to teach Information Policy and Government Information this fall and will require many revisions to the existing curriculum as many policies are changing and sources are no longer available. More details and updated syllabi will be available this summer. I am off to a good start with the flyers created by our wonderful office assistant that so very accurately reflect the content of these two courses.

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The People v. Edward Snowden

Students in my Information Policies and Politics course are preparing for their #infoshow16 presentation next week
We had a dress rehearsal during the last class, and as you can see from the photos, we were indeed dressed for the roles

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Judge Moore

We are divided into three groups:
Five students act as judge, jury and court recorders  and they are also putting together the trial website.
We also have the Prosecution and Defense teams and of course Edward Snowden

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Edward Snowden

The dress rehearsal ended in a hung jury and the judge declared a mistrial. During the #inforshow16 the audience acts as jury and will decide the outcome.

Is Edward Snowden guilty of
1.Theft of Government Property,
2.Unauthorized Communication of National Defense Information
3.Willful Communication of Classified Communications Intelligence Information to an Unauthorized Person

Have a sneak peek at the Prosecution questioning Snowden from here

Tu. May 17, 5pm room 609

Photo/video credits: Samantha Levin

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Loosely translated: The value of ephemera

The March 18 print issue of the book reviews from the Israeli paper Ha’aretz, includes a few columns on the value, insights and lessons to be gleaned from what we tend to think of as ephemeral publications.

Ariana Melamed writes about telephone directories. In the young state of Israel (est. 1948) the wait for a telephone was 10-15 years and the directories of the first decade read like the social registry of Israeli society. It included the old guard and the names listed were those of judges, members of Knesset, physicians and others of the well-connected elite. Up until the mid 1960’s it served as a who’s who of Israeli society and could be used to track social mobility, gentrification and changes in family structure.

Yuval Albashan writes about public records, specifically foreclosure cases. He deconstructs the tedious legalize of these documents down to their essence: Mr. S and his family were evicted from their house for a debt of about $2100, which includes fines and eviction charges. Everything is by the book, all the paperwork accurate, everything follows the letter of the law. The legal fees to the state for this eviction are close to $7000. You do the math.

Udi Orman begins by reminiscing on Ernest Hemingway who (allegedly?) wrote a six-word story on a napkin in the Algonquin hotel (For sale: baby shoes, never worn) and then goes on to write in praise of notes in the pre-twitter age. The kind we used to leave parents (dad, wake me up at 5:30, I need to study for a math test) or roommates (I paid the phone bill, you owe me half). Some notes were more elaborate, like the micro writing on the crib sheets for the world history exam.

The strongest social statement is made by Vered Lee who describes the business cards to be found all over Tel-Aviv advertising the services of call-girls, massage parlors and similar businesses.Screen Shot 2016-03-27 at 3.40.26 PM She quotes Henri Bergson (who quote  Un modéré par habitude, un libéral par instinct is part of my signature file) who said that chaos is order we can’t see. Lee sees in these business cards proof to the silent institutionalizing of these services and protests the sharp contrast between illusion and reality. The prevailing color is pink, the images fairy-tale like, the language suggestive, and the solicitation indirect. And what is missing? No word on abuse, violence, depression, stigma, addiction, fatigue, malaise, and shorter than average life expectancy. Small pink business cards scattered all over the sidewalks, concealing the lives of the women who are really the ones out on the street.

As someone who teaches reference, I am well aware of the value of these publications, especially for future research. We regularly receive requests for high school yearbooks, business and telephone directories, old newspaper ads and more. We librarians struggle to capture, preserve, digitize and make these drafts of history available to future generations.


Coming this fall: E-government Information and Users & Information and Human Rights

Coming this fall:
LIS 613: E-government Information and Users, W. 06:30PM
LIS 697-2 Information and Human Rights, Tu. 06:30PM

E-government Information and Users
There is no better year than an election year to teach a course about government information, and this election year offers us plenty to go on. Last time I taught this course in an election year, students participated in archiving the social media of the federal government and of electoral candidates. The project is described in Signal, the Library of Congress preservation blogs, and resulted in several publications.

We’ll have to see what unfolds by Aug 2016, but some likely candidates now are Supreme Court nominations, maybe something building on VisualFA , another project accomplished with significant contributions by students, or perhaps another collaboration with the Library of Congress End of Term Harvest team.

The 2015 syllabus is available here, an updated version will be available in the summer once some political dust settles.

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Information and Human Rights
This is a new course that I am currently developing and the syllabus attached here is still very much in draft version.
We will examine the role of information and information professionals in human rights activism. How do we fill our role with dignity and honor to the people we serve. How do we avoid mistakes made in the past by NGOs and the United Nations, journalist.
We will work around three case studies and culminate with the 2030 U.N. Agenda.
For the final project I feel inspired to create something in the spirit of this movie from available from Good magazine and using CIA data
We can possibly make this related to the 2030 UN Agenda.

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NYPL Map Warper tutorial

We are pleased to present to you a new edition of the Map Warper tutorial, created Dec. 2013 and uploaded March 2014.
In this tutorial, you will learn how to use the New York Public Library’s Map Warper tool to bring the past into the digital present.
This tutorial will show you how to overlay historical maps onto present day locations by georectfying, or warping maps from the NYPL collection.
The Map Warper allows you to align an historical map with its contemporary counterpart.
Rectified maps can be useful for a variety of reasons. “They can be used to study the rate of population growth, or the effects of a natural disaster on the landscape, or maybe you just want to compare your present day neighborhood to what it looked like in the past” (Rossy Mendez & Eric Mortensen, 2014, unpublished map tutorial)
Rectifying maps contributes to the public domain. Once a map is rectified it becomes part of the NYPL rectified map collection and can be used and accessed by subsequent users.
The Map Waprer allows users to become urban archeologists using digital tools to dig into the past and connect it to the present.

This tutorial was created by Corina Bardoff, Leah Honor and Bill Levay, MLIS candidates at Pratt Institute, School of Information and Library Science. This project was as assignment for the course Information Services and Sources. The class partnered with the Map Division at NYPL to update their tutorial, which was very long (over 10min.) and outdated.
Working in groups of 2-4 students and using Camtasia, the class created eight tutorials. All were excellent in their own way and the competition was hard, but ultimately the good people at NYPL, led by Matt Knutzen selected this tutorial (See on NYPL website).

The assignment helped students demonstrate several of Pratt SILS program-wide student learning objectives, specifically in the area of
Communication – Students demonstrate excellent communication skills and create and convey content
Technology – Students use information technology and digital tools effectively
User-Centered Focus – Students apply concepts related to use and users of information and user needs and perspectives
LIS Practice – Students perform within the framework of professional practice

We are glad to have had this opportunity to work with NYPL and look forward to future collaborations.