How the Librarians Saved History: Harvesting Government History, One Web Page at a Time

My work is rewarding whether is gets recognition or not, but I have to admit, it was nice to get an honorable mention in this NYTimes article.   screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-11-29-42-pm

There is so much I love about what I do, and where I do it and who I do it with, and this project brought it all together. My fellow harvesters and I were all connected by at most 1.5 degrees of separation. There was even someone who was in a class I taught a zillion years ago when I was an adjunct at Queens College!

It is so great to go the conferences and events and run into so many Pratt graduates, many were my students and took my information policy or government information classes. I remember their term papers and their presentations, and it is great to see them involved in information activism.

But now that my five minutes of fame are over it’s time to get back to work for access to information. Looking for suggestions. And don’t forget to #GovDocs@Trump


Double feature: #GovDocs2Trump Tweetathon and End of Term Harvest

This came to me through library channels and may have originated from @noftalee . The idea is to tweet Trump some of the documents that tell the story of our country.

The Tweetathon announcement  says:

#GovDocs2Trump Tweetathon

America deserves a president who is well versed in the history of this nation and the documents upon which that history was built. Let’s present those documents to the President-Elect through his favorite medium–Twitter.

Tweetathon will begin at 9am (central) on December 1, 2016. You are welcome to join at any time.

Feel free to use whatever government related document (Supreme Court decisions, innagurial addresses, speeches, early American papers, etc.) strikes your fancy.

Tag each tweet with the hashtag #GovDocs2Trump and please send them to @realdonaldtrump. This way we can fill his feed.

Finally, please make your first tweet “Dear @realDonaldTrump, We the people demand an informed President.

So yes, of course I plan to join the Tweetathon. In fact, I started making a list of documents I will send. These include the CONAN, The US Constitution Annotated , the Nixon grand jury records  and many more

For those who would like to join the conversation but need suggestions on where to find government documents, here are some suggestions:

Our Documents  has a list of 100 millstones documents from American history such as the Emancipation Proclamation . A much larger collection is available from Govinfo and Government Publishing Office’s database. Browse their index  for Executive orders, Presidential papers and more.

Are your interests in history, diplomacy, foreign affairs? Try FRUS  Foreign relations of the United States. There you will find all the correspondences, cables, letters, etc. between presidents and other official. The collection is arranged by president and by topic. For example John F Kennedy Kennedy-Khrushchev Exchanges, Volume VI (it’s basically a retrospective edited wikileaks)

For those that are more into numbers, there are reports from the Census Bureau  on topic such as poverty as well as infographics

And the Double Feature? The start of the Tweetathon happens to coincide with the End of Term Harvest event I am facilitating tomorrow at the New York Academy of Medicine

Grey Literature End of Term Harvest. 10-1pm, The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029.

The change of government administration brings the potential to eliminate websites, remove information and limit access to past administration content. This day we will identify such websites, particularly in areas on the Affordable Care Act, climate change and more, focusing on government social media and information not on .gov domains.

The plan is to double dip. Not matter where you are #GovDocs2Trump


Archiving the Obama administration

On Thursday. Dec 1 I will be facilitating an event in which participants help archive websites for the Obama administration, website that are in danger of disappearing with the change of administration. The event is hosted by the New York Academy of Medicine. Details on NYAM website Archiving instructions are available here

screen-shot-2016-11-21-at-4-34-29-pm


Coming this fall: E-government Information and Users & Information and Human Rights

Coming this fall:
LIS 613: E-government Information and Users, W. 06:30PM
LIS 697-2 Information and Human Rights, Tu. 06:30PM

E-government Information and Users
There is no better year than an election year to teach a course about government information, and this election year offers us plenty to go on. Last time I taught this course in an election year, students participated in archiving the social media of the federal government and of electoral candidates. The project is described in Signal, the Library of Congress preservation blogs, and resulted in several publications.

We’ll have to see what unfolds by Aug 2016, but some likely candidates now are Supreme Court nominations, maybe something building on VisualFA , another project accomplished with significant contributions by students, or perhaps another collaboration with the Library of Congress End of Term Harvest team.

The 2015 syllabus is available here, an updated version will be available in the summer once some political dust settles.

FlyerEGovernment

Information and Human Rights
This is a new course that I am currently developing and the syllabus attached here is still very much in draft version.
We will examine the role of information and information professionals in human rights activism. How do we fill our role with dignity and honor to the people we serve. How do we avoid mistakes made in the past by NGOs and the United Nations, journalist.
We will work around three case studies and culminate with the 2030 U.N. Agenda.
For the final project I feel inspired to create something in the spirit of this movie from available from Good magazine and using CIA data
We can possibly make this related to the 2030 UN Agenda.

Flyer_Rabina_FA16.jpg


The End of Term Harvest: An Abundant Crop

I am so proud to be featured today on Signal, the Library of Congress
Digital Preservation blog, for the work I did with my students contributing content to the End of Term harvest.

I want to thank all the students who worked on this project: Laural Angrist, Leo Bellino, Denis Chaves, Megan Fenton, Eloise Flood, Shanta Gee, Lucia Kasiske, Mike Kohler, Emily Lundeen, Julia Marden, Joan, Erin Noto, Lauren Reinhalter, Megan Roberts, Malina Thiede and Rachel Wittmann (who provided the title for this blog).

You can read the Signal blog here: