Capturing government websites during the 2013 shutdown

The shutdown of the U.S. government between Oct. 1-16 left government websites in varying stages of disarray. Some agencies shut their websites completely, others remained accessible although no longer maintained, and others still seemed unaffected.
Libraries and commercial vendors stepped in to fill the gap. Librarians created LibGuides with updates on the status of government websites and sources, and commercial vendors provided temporary complimentary access to their databases that are based of government information. In the few days that past since the reopening of the government, these LibGuides ceased to exist and commercial access removed (in fact, access to Social Explorer ceased two days before the shutdown ended). This should not be surprising given the nature of immediacy of websites where here-today-gone-tomorrow is the prevailing approach and the historic value of documenting transitions is overlooked.

I thought it worthwhile to document government websites during the shutdown and was looking for a way to do so quickly and with the limited technology tools and skills available to me. The immediate solution was to capture government websites with Zotero and create a library of websites at the time on the shutdown.

Zotero is an open source bibliographic citation manager from George Mason University. It can be integrated to a web browser and when clicking ‘add’, it will capture the website displayed in the browser, saving a screenshot of the website as well as the bibliographic citation. It is quick and easy to use and answered the needs of this project.

My first priority was to capture all official government websites. Using the A-Z list from USA.gov, I captured 405 websites from the legislative, executive and judicial branches as well as quasi-governmental websites. All the websites are available from this Zotero library.
Screen Shot 2013-10-20 at 6.34.38 PM

Next, I decided to capture the official social media websites used by the U.S. government. This part of the project was done by my colleague Anthony Cocciolo. We based the capture of social media sites on work previously done for the End of Term Harvest. Anthony wrote a script for a program that would crawl all the social media websites, import them into Zotero and capture their screenshots. The result is a library of 1356 government social media websites.
Screen Shot 2013-10-20 at 6.37.57 PM
The final step of this project is still in progress, and includes adding tags to all snapshots. These tags can allow future researchers to search the collection applying different filters such as shutdown status (Completely shut down, Available but not updated, No apparent change), by branch of government (Executive, Executive Office of the President, etc) and by agency (Dept. of Labor, Interior, etc.). These tags must be added manually and I will continue to do so over the next few weeks.

While we recognize this is not a true archive, we hope this capture will help those who are interested in learning more about the status of government website during the shutdown.

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