EOT Harvest, part V: By the numbers

No report is complete without the numbers, and our numbers are in.
In all, the 16 students in the class nominated 1513 social media sites. Many more were reviewed but not all made the cut, either because they were out of scope, required password to access or had some problem associated with them.

Total 1513 sites nominated
Average 92 nominations per student
Range: 53-275 nominations

In terms of social media sites, the three leading sites are:
Facebook (32%)
Twitter (30%)
YouTube (17%)

In addition to these, there is a very long tail of over twenty social media sites that included both well-known and lesser-known sites such as Tumblr, Pinterest, Vimeo, Picasa and slideshare.

The leading agencies were
Dept. of Defense, State Department, Department of Agriculture and NASA

The limitation of numbers being what they are, I will begin with the disclaimer – the number apply only for this project and the way in which it was managed. I would be hard pressed to venture and guess the total number of social media site the federal government maintains, or their distribution.

Overall students were impressed by the wide use and variety of information they found. As one student said, “The kind of information that each one produces is quite a bit more extensive and somewhat more focused than I realized.”
Students were surprised by the widespread use of social media in government, including by agencies that traditionally avoided interaction with the general public. The Secret Service uses social media extensively for public relations and marketing services, and without a doubt J. Edgar Hoover is turning in his grave.
And while marketing and public relations constitutes a major use of social media, we did also see some creative uses as well. For example, the Central Texas Dept. of Veteran Affairs Tweet their daily lunch menu (for Thanksgiving: Lunch: Rst Turkey/Gravy, Cranberry Sce, Cornbread Dressing, Sweet Potatoes, Green Beans Supreme, Dinner Roll, Pumpkin Pie, Coffee/Tea) and the Border Patrol uses Pinterest for public education.

Menu of what’s being served at Central Texas VA Center


The project helped students understand and often appreciate, the role of social media in communicating with the public. We discovered that almost every agency searched had a Twitter account. As the work coincided with hurricane Sandy in New York one student observed: “During the hurricane, I was without power and relied heavily on Twitter for information from the City and Con Edison. After that experience (and after being told by some friendly police officers that it was where they were getting all their information), I understood why the federal government would rely so heavily on Twitter as opposed to other social media outlets. “

Most directly, in terms of supporting the course goals, students learned a lot about the information sources of the federal government and the limitations of social media.
There were also indirect lessons. Many students felt this project made them more aware of the work of government. As one student said “this project inspired me to become a more informed citizen” and some drew broader conclusions about the shifting role of government, from making information available to actively trying to communicate information directly to citizens.

With the conclusion of the project, I would like to thank all the student who participated in the End of Term harvest: Laural Angrist, Leo Bellino, Denis Chaves, Megan Fenton, Eloise Flood, Shanta Gee, Lucia Kasiske, Mike Kohler, Emily Lundeen, Julia Marden, Joan, Erin Noto, Lauren Reinhalter, Megan Roberts, Malina Thiede and Rachel Whittmann

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2 Comments on “EOT Harvest, part V: By the numbers”

  1. F. Humphrey says:

    How do you personally get information for your future articles, which search resources or techniques do you commonly rely on?

    • Dear F. Humphrey,

      Thank you for your interest in my research. There is no single method or source I use for my research, each research project requires different set of sources or methods. I usually focus on qualitative social science methods and use both primary (particularly government and data sources) and secondary (primarily research articles) sources.

      Sincerely,
      D. Rabina


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